Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently asked questions

How do I access my training plan?


When you purchase a plan you will receive a receipt by e-mail. There is a link on the receipt to download your training plan. Plans are in pdf format, to keep on your computer, phone or mobile device. They can also be printed.




Do training plans use power, heart rate or other data?


The plans do not use heart rate, power and make scarce use of the stop watch. Instead we encourage the athlete to learn to listen to their body, which is a very important training ability. We use perceived exertion (moderate, medium, mad) to measure training intensity, because on a day when fatigue is high, heart rate, power and times may all be different from a day when more rested. Hence speeds or power output for a hard workout change daily, and a workout today that one perceives to be poor if looking purely at data, may well be an excellent workout.




Do you give a satisfaction guarantee?


Bad refund policies are infuriating. You feel like the company is just trying to rip you off. We never want our customers to feel that way, so our refund policy is simple: If you’re ever unhappy with our products, for any reason, just contact robbie@trisutto.com and we’ll take care of you. Send us a note, tell us what’s up, and we’ll work with you to make sure you’re happy.




What currency are the products in?


Our products are priced in US Dollars.




How are plans structured?


Most plans have 4 week blocks with workout variations and increases in training load between blocks. However, the weekly structure stays relatively the same throughout the plan. We find this best for scheduling workouts around work and family as well as observing progress. Each week there is a variety of workouts to cover the main areas of training (strength, speed, endurance, strength endurance). The workouts and the combination of the workouts is designed to give the best return (race results) on training time invested. All of the workouts are used in Brett Sutton’s own training of athletes, simply modified to make them suitable for the specific training plan. We aim for the best return on training investment, not to see how many hours we can log in our diary.




Is every workout included?


Every plan contains all workouts for the duration of the plan, including the important week before race day, as well as recovery advice for the weeks after.




Are there rest days in the plans?


We encourage athletes to listen to their body and take a rest day as they feel they need it. Often this may be dictated by life circumstances – work and family, so a standard one day per week as designated rest does not allow for this flexibility. Instead if life gets in the way, simply make that a rest day and resume training the following day – without attempting to squeeze in yesterday’s workouts into an already busy schedule!




Which Iron Distance plan should I purchase?


The plan closest to the number of weekly hours you are currently training, and / or reasonably have time each week based on your other life commitments such as work and family.




Do plans include strength training / gym work?


Trisutto plans do include strength training. It is built into the swim, the bike and the run – not with additional gym workouts on top. In the swim we work with paddles and pull buoy, on the bike it is big gear on the turbo trainer or in the hills, and on the run it is fartlek, hills and tempo running.




What is the Pro Workouts Package?


The pro workout pack contains 38 workouts that were used to train a number of World Champion and Olympic medallist triathletes over the last 20+ years. For each workout a pdf document details three versions of the workout based on the levels of pro, age group experienced, and age group less experienced. There is a video accompanying most of these that can be viewed online. Video url and password are on the workout pdf (videos cannot be downloaded, but there is no limit on number of times they can be viewed). Videos’s are 1 to 3 minutes duration, and were recorded in situ at training camp In each video Brett describes the workout, its purpose and with which champion athlete that workout is associated with. The workouts can be used to complement any training plan. As an example:




How long are the stimulus plans?


The stimulus programs are one week programs that are repeated for 3 to 4 weeks at a time as a short focus block on either the swim, the bike or the run. When used in this manner we don’t need to vary the week, actually the opposite; the same week done a number of times in a row allows us to get the most out of the program. Then return to our standard balanced program after this stimulus block. This cycle can be repeated 2 or 3 times. Usually in the ‘off’ or ‘pre’ season. As athletes and coaches think ahead to a summer season, below are some simple guidelines on how we structure our training and racing year. It's important to mention that we use this reverse periodisation approach and structure regardless of distance being raced. Both Nicola Spirig training for the Olympics, and Daniela Ryf training for Kona, follow the same principles:
Part 1: Recovery
In this period we do only one easy short session a day to keep body ticking over. This is a physical and mental break from the rigours of training and racing. An example being 2 to 3 weeks over the Christmas and New Year holiday season.

Part 2: Lead In Training
Here we build the number of sessions back up to normal (usually twice a day) but without the volume or speed. Although returning to twice a day training, the workouts are shorter than normal. This period is generally 2 to 3 weeks duration.

Part 3: Stimulus Training
Most athletes have a weaker area, which for many triathletes is the swim. However stimulus programs can also focus on improving the bike or the run. We use a focused / stimulus approach on one area at a time, as it is difficult to improve 3 areas simultaneously once we have progressed past our initial 3 to 6 months of training in the sport (when we improve simply by becoming ‘more fit’).

While following a stimulus training plan for 3 to 4 weeks to improve one area, the other two areas are maintained. We return to a balanced training plan for 3 to 4 weeks, before we repeat the stimulus period a second time.
Part 4: Short Course Training
We then move on to an Olympic distance program where we add speed work. Yes, it is early season and no, no mega miles are used as a base.
This phase is at least 8 weeks, and continues up to our first short course training race of the season – Sprint or Olympic distance triathlon. We expect to see an improvement in the discipline that was the focus of our earlier stimulus program. We also expect to feel physically and mentally ready to race well.

At this point out short course athletes continue building upon their programs in alignment with their goals and needs. Our athletes looking to excel in Iron distance racing move into Half Iron distance training as their next progression.

Part 5: The Half Iron Distance Plan
After 3 or 4 days of easy light recovery training, we move into Half Iron / 70.3 training phase. Here we gradually lengthen the bike and run hours, along with the length of efforts. The long run gets longer as does the long bike. Swim workouts stay the same or increase marginally. The ‘over distance’ component is of appropriate duration for the half distance, and we maintain the shorter strength and speed workouts in our plan that we introduced during our stimulus and short course training period.

Part 6: Race Preparation Phase
As we approach a summer Half Iron / 70.3 race, we have a short race preparation phase. We don’t like to call it a taper as too many people misuse this terminology.

Within this phase traditional methodology has everybody cutting their distances and resting. We also rest but we don’t cut any distance of training in any of the three disciplines. We reduce the intensity during race week. The day before the race, we don’t sit and rest but do a light workout on all three disciplines just to move the body.

Part 7: Iron Distance Lead In
After a week of light training to recover from our Half Iron / 70.3 race, we increase the number of workouts back to normal, with a few added active recovery days, before starting our Iron distance plan.

Part 8: The Iron Distance Plan
For the first time we will start to do the training that most associate with their early season base work. The longer aerobic bike and runs will be built into the program. As we did during the Half Iron period, we maintain a mix of strength and speed workouts in swim, bike and run. We layer the longer work on top of the shorter.

Part 9: Race Preparation Phase
The race preparation phase for Iron distance is similar to the Half distance. We reduce intensity, but do not cut the distance of training. This final phase leading into our Iron distance race will include a long run and a long ride - both done with minimal effort i.e. at an easy slow pace.

Part 10: Races post Iron Distance
After our Iron distance race, we have 1 to 3 weeks of light training, and lead in training similar to parts 1 and 2 described in this schedule.
If you plan to race a second Iron distance, count back the number of weeks to your next race, then resume the Iron distance training plan from that week up to race day. If you plan to return to short course or Half distance racing for the remainder of the season, then the same principle applies of returning to the Olympic plan or Half Distance plan up to race day.

This approach is applicable for athletes racing short course and Half Iron / 70.3 distance or full Iron distance. Structure your year with recovery, lead in, stimulus, then short course. If racing Half / 70.3 then move into that phase. If your focus is on short course racing, stick with the Olympic training plan. Athletes may also want to repeat a stimulus training period mid-year to continue to work on a weaker area.

The key is to remember that we do not overdo the long over distance work at the beginning of our preparation like mainstream triathlon recommends.

I hope this example can show you how to get the very best out of your training year using a reverse periodisation approach, and how Trisutto training plans can be used to guide you through each of the periods of the year.




What incline do you use on treadmill workouts to simulate road running?


Unless running hill repeats or ‘gradient’ sets, we use the treadmill at 0% (flat). Sports scientists will tell you to set it to 1% to simulate running on the road, however we do not want to emulate running on the road. Instead we use the treadmill to our advantage to develop leg turnover and rhythm.




How fast should run speed work be done?


When running short intervals, never run all out, instead think 90%. There is little additional return going faster and the risk of injury rises significantly. Instead look for a good turnover and rhythm to your running. For moderate, medium then mad workouts, the last 1/3rd at mad is meant to be pushing the pace, but as we have already been running at a good effort by the time we arrive at the last 1/3rd (and it is a continuous run), our speed is already governed by our fatigue. We are not sprinting, just pushing the pace with what we have left! The same as in the last part of a triathlon race. On race day the race is ‘just like training’.




The Iron Distance advanced plan is 20 hours average per week, or every week?


Our Advanced Iron Distance training plan commences at 18 hours per week for the first month, and builds a little to be 22 hours at it’s largest the last month before the race (except race week which reduces somewhat). There are two workouts on most days (although it is possible to put some back to back in the week if necessary. For example swim then run instead of one in the AM and one in the PM). Mid week workouts are in the 60 – 90 minute range with the long bike and long run on the weekend (along with some short recovery swims). If your weekend falls on days other than Saturday/Sunday simply move the plan forward X number of days to suit. i.e. think of the plan as Day 1 to Day 7, not Monday to Sunday. Rest days are taken as needed, or when best suits with other commitments.




Can I upload training plans into Training Peaks or other training software?


The training plans are in pdf format, and can not be 'uploaded'. However you can record (type) your workouts into any software that you usually use.




What are the payment options?


We accept Visa, Mastercard, American Express (AMEX), Discover and Paypal payments. If you have a Paypal account with a connected bank account, you can pay from a bank account. Paypal processes all payments at trisuttoshop.com However you do not need to have a Paypal account to pay by Visa, Mastercard, AMEX, Discover. Simply click on the PayPal button on the shopping cart, and enter your card details on the next screen to complete your purchase. Customers who prefer can log in to their Paypal account to complete their purchase.




How do I get help selecting the best plan(s) for me?


If you need some assistance or advice on selecting the best plan or plans for you, please write to robbie@trisutto.com




How do I use plans to structure my training and racing year?


As athletes and coaches think ahead to a summer season, below are some simple guidelines on how we structure our training and racing year. It's important to mention that we use this reverse periodisation approach and structure regardless of distance being raced. Both Nicola Spirig training for the Olympics, and Daniela Ryf training for Kona, follow the same principles:
Part 1: Recovery
In this period we do only one easy short session a day to keep body ticking over. This is a physical and mental break from the rigours of training and racing. An example being 2 to 3 weeks over the Christmas and New Year holiday season.

Part 2: Lead In Training
Here we build the number of sessions back up to normal (usually twice a day) but without the volume or speed. Although returning to twice a day training, the workouts are shorter than normal. This period is generally 2 to 3 weeks duration.

Part 3: Stimulus Training
Most athletes have a weaker area, which for many triathletes is the swim. However stimulus programs can also focus on improving the bike or the run. We use a focused / stimulus approach on one area at a time, as it is difficult to improve 3 areas simultaneously once we have progressed past our initial 3 to 6 months of training in the sport (when we improve simply by becoming ‘more fit’).

While following a stimulus training plan for 3 to 4 weeks to improve one area, the other two areas are maintained. We return to a balanced training plan for 3 to 4 weeks, before we repeat the stimulus period a second time.
Part 4: Short Course Training
We then move on to an Olympic distance program where we add speed work. Yes, it is early season and no, no mega miles are used as a base.
This phase is at least 8 weeks, and continues up to our first short course training race of the season – Sprint or Olympic distance triathlon. We expect to see an improvement in the discipline that was the focus of our earlier stimulus program. We also expect to feel physically and mentally ready to race well.

At this point out short course athletes continue building upon their programs in alignment with their goals and needs. Our athletes looking to excel in Iron distance racing move into Half Iron distance training as their next progression.

Part 5: The Half Iron Distance Plan
After 3 or 4 days of easy light recovery training, we move into Half Iron / 70.3 training phase. Here we gradually lengthen the bike and run hours, along with the length of efforts. The long run gets longer as does the long bike. Swim workouts stay the same or increase marginally. The ‘over distance’ component is of appropriate duration for the half distance, and we maintain the shorter strength and speed workouts in our plan that we introduced during our stimulus and short course training period.

Part 6: Race Preparation Phase
As we approach a summer Half Iron / 70.3 race, we have a short race preparation phase. We don’t like to call it a taper as too many people misuse this terminology.

Within this phase traditional methodology has everybody cutting their distances and resting. We also rest but we don’t cut any distance of training in any of the three disciplines. We reduce the intensity during race week. The day before the race, we don’t sit and rest but do a light workout on all three disciplines just to move the body.

Part 7: Iron Distance Lead In
After a week of light training to recover from our Half Iron / 70.3 race, we increase the number of workouts back to normal, with a few added active recovery days, before starting our Iron distance plan.

Part 8: The Iron Distance Plan
For the first time we will start to do the training that most associate with their early season base work. The longer aerobic bike and runs will be built into the program. As we did during the Half Iron period, we maintain a mix of strength and speed workouts in swim, bike and run. We layer the longer work on top of the shorter.

Part 9: Race Preparation Phase
The race preparation phase for Iron distance is similar to the Half distance. We reduce intensity, but do not cut the distance of training. This final phase leading into our Iron distance race will include a long run and a long ride - both done with minimal effort i.e. at an easy slow pace.

Part 10: Races post Iron Distance
After our Iron distance race, we have 1 to 3 weeks of light training, and lead in training similar to parts 1 and 2 described in this schedule.
If you plan to race a second Iron distance, count back the number of weeks to your next race, then resume the Iron distance training plan from that week up to race day. If you plan to return to short course or Half distance racing for the remainder of the season, then the same principle applies of returning to the Olympic plan or Half Distance plan up to race day.

This approach is applicable for athletes racing short course and Half Iron / 70.3 distance or full Iron distance. Structure your year with recovery, lead in, stimulus, then short course. If racing Half / 70.3 then move into that phase. If your focus is on short course racing, stick with the Olympic training plan. Athletes may also want to repeat a stimulus training period mid-year to continue to work on a weaker area.

The key is to remember that we do not overdo the long over distance work at the beginning of our preparation like mainstream triathlon recommends.

I hope this example can show you how to get the very best out of your training year using a reverse periodisation approach, and how Trisutto training plans can be used to guide you through each of the periods of the year.




Do we have plans for new / inexperienced triathletes?


Trisutto began in the early 1990's as an age group triathlon team. We believe triathlon is a wonderful way for everyone to exercise. So we have a range of plans to cater for everyone and all abilities. Our 8 week recreation triathlon program consists of a swim one day, a bike the next day, and run the following day. Do this twice through and take the seventh day rest. Our swim pack of 1000-2000m swims caters for those who swim as part of their exercise routine; or to mix in with their bike and run workouts. Our progressive plans in sprint, olympic distance, half and full iron distance incorporate our Trisutto training methods that have been so successful with our professional athletes. These are tailored to suit busy age group athletes wanting to achieve their best with limited time, however the principles remain the same. Designed to build incrementally on each other, a triathlete following our sprint or olympic plans, can happily transition over time to our half and later full distance plans while following the Trisutto training methods. This modular facilitates our reverse periodisation principle of progression through a training year, and incorporating stimulus / focus training if required to address weaker parts of our race.




I'm a professional athlete do you have plans for me?


Yes! Our advanced olympic distance plan, and advanced full iron distance plan are for you. Also available are our professional stimulus plans if you have a weaker area that you want to work on.




Trisutto plans have been awesome, but I'd like to try 1-1 coaching?


Training plans are convenient, cost effective and allow athletes full control of their destiny! However some athletes benefit from the supervision of a coach, and having someone to 'be accountable to'! Some athletes have busy schedules that can change frequently, so will benefit from a coach to design a custom plan to accomate that, as well as adapt that as required on a day to day basis. Trisutto coaches are available at trisutto.com or contact robbie@trisutto.com





Contact

St Moritz, 7500
Switzerland
robbie@trisutto.com

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